Search

Yorkshire Sculpture Park

Updated: May 16

I recently visited the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. A fabulous amazing and extremely cold day out.

I saw the wonderful natural sculptures by David Nash, so pleased I got to see these two pieces. The first one here is called '49 Square' and is a square of forty-nine Himalayan Silver Birch trees in seven by seven rows and is intended to create a natural growing cube. I look forward to returning over the years to see it develop.

(Sadly my photo really doesn't do this justice)

His other amazing piece was the Black Mound which looks at the natural cycle of a trees life.

When I came across the inviting building created by Heather Peak and Ivan Morison. I was firstly intrigued by the circular building, which turns out to be a doughnut shape with Silver Birch trees growing through it. I entered in one door to find a corridor, blocked to the right with a tree, so I had to walk left. As I walked through I looked at the buildings construction of wattle and daub and above the thatched roof. I then reached a door that lead into the inner sanctum. A place that had a sense of peace. I sat on the seats under the lattice overhanging canopy of lattice and thatch and I had a moment of sheer calmness. The presence of the trees was a joy and I'm sure if I had sat there longer I would have been joined by birds. I love it so much I wish I had it in my garden.


Of course when you visit the sculpture park you cannot miss the magnificent and beautifully organic sculptures of Henry Moore. This stunning sculpture he called 'Two Large Forms' was truly stunning. Such a shame you can't touch and move around it but I had seen damage on a granite piece by another artist, so I suspect it is for the best to keep them safe. What captured me with his pieces was the way the light and shadows played with the curves. On a warmer day, I would have stayed longer to look and stare but sadly it was so bitterly cold the only way to enjoy the place was to keep walking!


I found Barbara Hepworth sculptures tucked behind the visitors centre. This piece called 'Squares with two circles' really made me stop. The circles produced captured images of the the view behind and the two tones used in the metals worked with the land and sky.

If you ever get the chance to visit this wonderful playground of art I know you will find it captivating and thoroughly enjoyable.

Link: https://ysp.org.uk/